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  • WikiLeaks feiert seinen zehnten Geburtstag und lädt dafür nach Berlin. Plattformgründer Julian Assange beweist dabei einmal mehr, wie gut er darin ist, Fans und Gegner auf die Folter zu spannen.
  • In den USA wird offenbar eine Klage gegen Julian Assange vorbereitet. Das hat der WikiLeaks-Gründer stets befürchtet. Dabei hatte es zuletzt zwischen ihm und dem Trump-Lager fast nach Freundschaft ausgesehen.
  • David House, 23, is an IT expert from Boston who works for the Bradley Manning Support Network, which is campaigning on behalf of the alleged WikiLeaks whistleblower. In an interview with SPIEGEL ONLINE, House speaks about the charges against Manning, the harsh conditions under which he is being held and the possibility that he could face the death penalty.
  • The conditions under which presumed WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning are being held have been tightened again. Even US politicians believe they're illegal. In the latest development, a key State Department official has resigned over critical remarks he made about Manning's detainment.
  • WikiLeaks documents on Guantanamo and earlier diplomatic cables reveal the arbitrary treatment of prisoners at the infamous camp. They also underscore America's fears of not being able to properly monitor prisoners after their release. One cable obtained by SPIEGEL describes a suggestion by the Saudi king to implant electronic chips to monitor released inmates.
  • Chat transcripts by Bradley Manning, the alleged source of secret US government documents for WikiLeaks, will be used as evidence in his military trial. They reveal a conflicted and lonely young soldier who felt strongly about revealing "almost criminal" behavior. He's spent 14 months in jail, but there is still no date for his trial.
  • A WikiLeaks file containing the original leaked US State Department cables has inadvertently been released onto the Internet. The documents have not been edited to protect sources, meaning that the lives of informants could be at risk.
  • Some 250,000 diplomatic dispatches from the US State Department have accidentally been made completely public. The files include the names of informants who now must fear for their lives. It is the result of a series of blunders by WikiLeaks and its supporters.
  • The release of the complete archive of unredacted US State Department diplomatic cables has been condemned by WikiLeaks' previous media partners and has drawn strong criticism from editorialists at major German publications. Some accuse Julian Assange of abusing his power.
  • For some, Bradley Manning is a hero. Others feel that the US soldier, who is accused of providing secret documents to WikiLeaks, is a traitor and a threat to American security. The military proceedings against him, which begin Friday, are likely to end in a guilty verdict.
  • The loose-knit hacker collective Anonymous has a new target in its sights: Germany's far-right scene. The group has launched a new WikiLeaks-style website publishing confidential data obtained from the far-right NPD party and other extremist groups. It's all part of an ongoing war on neo-Nazis that the group has dubbed Operation Blitzkrieg.
  • Ecuador on Thursday said it would grant political asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been holed up in the country's embassy in London for weeks now. Britain says it still intends to extradite the whistleblower to Sweden, where he faces questioning over allegations of sexual offenses.
  • Ecuador may have granted WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange asylum, but it seems unlikely that he will ever make it to the South American country. More to the point, say German commentators, is the fact that both Ecuador and Britain have granted Assange an even larger soap box.
  • The tax authority in the city-state of Hamburg is suddenly playing an important role in determining the future of the whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks. By revoking the tax-exempt status of the site's main financial supporter in Germany for the 2010 calendar year, the authority could place a further strain on the organization's future.
  • WikiLeaks hat US-Botschaftsdepeschen veröffentlicht, die einen Blick auf deutsche Politiker in den siebziger Jahren erlauben. Von Brandts Ostpolitik über Honeckers gescheiterte Kontaktversuche bis zu Schmidts Tabakkonsum - die USA waren stets informiert.
  • Offiziell herrscht diplomatische Eiszeit zwischen Israel und den Golfstaaten - inoffiziell bestehen seit Jahren wirtschaftliche Beziehungen. Nun will Israel mit den Golf-Arabern über Twitter in Kontakt treten. Die Reaktionen sind gemischt.
  • A US military court acquitted Bradley Manning of the worst charge against him, but he isn't out of the woods yet.
  • By using the Espionage Act to punish Bradley Manning, the Obama administration has shown how far it will go to intimidate leakers. His sentencing is a stain on the president's legacy and on America's global reputation.
  • For decades, Germany's position in the West remained unquestioned. Following the NSA spying and other political scandals, many Germans want greater independence from the US. But does that mean getting closer to Moscow?
  • WikiLeaks is now 10 years old. SPIEGEL met with founder Julian Assange, 45, to discuss the whistleblower platform's achievements and whether recent criticism leveled at the site is justified.
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